Plato"s Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito
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Plato"s Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito

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Published by Rowman & Littlefield in Lanham, Md .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Plato,
  • Plato,
  • Plato,
  • Socrates

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Rachana Kamtekar.
SeriesCritical essays on the classics, Critical essays on the classics
ContributionsKamtekar, Rachana, 1965-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB370 .P53 2005
The Physical Object
Paginationxix, 264 p. ;
Number of Pages264
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20024860M
ISBN 100742533247, 0742533255
LC Control Number2004014138
OCLC/WorldCa55887279

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This magnificent compilation has four Plato writings: "Euthyphro," "Apology," "Crito," and "Phaedo." Though apparently early works and not as complex or philosophically influential as later ones, they are immensely important in portraying Socrates' trial and death/5(4). Euthyphro contains a massive dialogue about the will of the gods and right and wrong, The Defence covers the actual trial of Socrates, and Crito contains a lengthy dialogue about abiding to law for the sake of not undermining the government system. S The stories in this book follow Socrates as written by Plato/5.   The book is written by Plato, one of the staunch devoted pupil of Socrates and prominent ancient philosopher. The book is nothing but the translation of three of Plato’s works namely, “The Apologia”, “The Crito” and “The Phaedo” all of which have reference to the trial, imprisonment and death of Socrates/5(50). I read the Penguin edition of this book, which was translated by Hugh Tredennick. Written by Plato, this text is a testimony to the great philosopher, Socrates ( BC). It is set out in four parts - Euthyphro, The Apology, Crito, and Phaedo/5.

Free download or read online Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition of the novel was published in , and was written by Plato. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of pages and is /5. Summary. Plato's dialog called Euthyphro relates a discussion that took place between Socrates and Euthyphro concerning the meaning of piety, or that virtue usually regarded as a manner of living that fulfills one's duty both to gods and to is of particular interest in relation to the fate of Socrates inasmuch as he has recently been charged with impiety and is about to be tried. Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo About Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo The philosophy of ancient Greece reached its highest level of achievement in the works of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The influence of these men on the culture of . Like both the Euthyphro and the Apology, this dialog reveals something of the character of Socrates by describing the manner in which he faced difficult circumstances without being overcome by them. In the Crito, particular attention is given to the reasons advanced by Socrates for refusing to escape from prison as a means of saving his own life.

The "Apology" (not a dialogue), "Crito, Euthyphro, " and the unforgettable "Phaedo" relate the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous "Symposium" and "Phaedrus, " written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love/5. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning . Euthyphro (εὐθύφρων, c. – BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates ( BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro. The dialogue covers subjects such as the meaning of piety a Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, /5.   Plato’s Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo•Complete, ated (in English) By: Benjamin Jowett***The Apology of Socrates*** (Greek: Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους, Apología Sokrátous; Latin: Apologia Socratis), by Plato, is the Socratic dialogue that presents the speech of legal self-defence, which Socrates presented at his trial for impiety and Cited by: